Cannabis Is Becoming More Popular Among the Elderly

A health survey found that more senior citizens have recently used cannabis either medically or recreationally
09 November 2021
2 min read
Cannabis Is Becoming More Popular Among the Elderly

An astonishing 6 percent of the elderly population in the United States are recent cannabis users. The findings published earlier this month show that the uptrend continues as medical and recreational marijuana becomes increasingly available throughout the nation.

The trend should be of no surprise since cannabis can alleviate symptoms of many serious conditions of old age. The substance can also help your grandparents fully enjoy their retirement.

Huge Medical Potential

The 2020 National Survey of Drug Use and Health also questioned the elderly participants about their lifetime use. And this number was at a whopping 36 percent, suggesting that back in the day, your pop-pop probably knew how to party — before he got all buttoned-up and respectable.

And while in the Woodstock era, scientists only studied weed for its supposed damaging effects, more recent research has been focusing on its medical benefits. The moderate use of cannabis can elevate the mood of elderly patients and raise their general well-being. It can also help treat the symptoms of such debilitating and even life-threatening illnesses as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, or multiple sclerosis.


Cannabis Is Becoming More Popular Among the Elderly: A caregiver adding cannabis oil in a cup that an elderly woman holds

A tincture is a perfect way for the elderly to consume cannabis.


Dr. Juan Sanchez-Ramos from the University of South Florida explained that low doses of THC would not harm aging patients. Taken in moderation, it doesn’t cause either bewilderment or disorientation.

However, it’s best to start cannabinoid treatment after a consultation with a doctor. Cannabis may be better than traditional pharmaceuticals for some patients, but it isn’t the first thing that comes to mind, and a physician should consider less controversial approaches first.

Wasted on the Young

Mounting research suggests that cannabis is a drug that seems almost tailored to older persons’ needs. While it can interfere with the development of the young brain—which continues into the mid-20s—cannabis increases neuroplasticity in older brains.


Cannabis Is Becoming More Popular Among the Elderly: An elderly woman is grinding cannabis buds and is about to roll a marijuana cigarette

Even smoking cannabis is a legitimate way to medicate.


The formation of new neural pathways may help aging brains “get out of the rut”. One study even suggested that low doses of THC may improve memory. The effect was only studied in mice, but it was short of a miracle to see grizzled rodents start running their mazes exactly like young ones after THC treatment.

So, it’s hardly surprising that cannabis legalization leads to more and more older people turning to this natural medicine. At least in the United States. In the UK and elsewhere in Europe, the substance is still illegal, so we aren’t likely to witness this trend any time soon.

Medical Disclaimer

This content is for educational purposes only. The information provided is derived from research gathered from external sources.

 

09 November 2021
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